kraydel sound INTERACTIONS 

kraydel sound INTERACTIONS 

CALLING INTERACTION

29 - 01 -2019

INCOMING CALLS

Overview: 

The focus of the sound design has orientated around creating a sonic language which is predominantly associated with the Kraydel system - going further than stylistic elements - a sound design which considers the entire Kraydel system.

What do we mean by 'going beyond style'?  

 

The design here aims to build on the sonic usability of the product - aiming to create a clear and unmistakable identity. Can we establish a sound world which not only allows the user to determine that Kraydel is calling out to them, but that is removed far enough from other sound sources. This sonic differentiation between Kraydel and other sounds is perhaps the biggest challenge - there is no way to identify what other devices might be present in the varying home environments and therefore, establishing reference points is, at this stage, not a possibility. However, by looking beyond style/aesthetic, we can begin to consider other parameters, such as the hardware and spatial positioning.

 

Direction and Spatial Considerations: 

By utilising sound frequencies that are particularly effective in determining sound direction, we can start to consider the Kraydel Hub as an extension of the sound design. Some of the tones below exploit this parameter - their aim is to place the sound firmly at the hub, ultimately meaning that the user is likely to go to where the sound is being emitted. It's important to note that at this stage I haven't applied this technique to the alert tones.    

Sonic Differentiation: 

The incoming call function is a moment in which Kraydel is asking the user to respond, but unlike an alert, interacting with this function will produce an interactive event. The design of the tones below has been influenced by this aspect - placing emphasis on differentiation between other moments when Kraydel reaches out. Creating a clear sonic contrast between anything being emitted from the television and the Kraydel Hub has also been a key factor driving the sound design. By using high frequencies, at a slightly higher amplitude repetitively further enables the user to determine that there is an incoming call, even if they can't see the television. 

 

Age Related Hearing Loss:

Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is the loss of hearing that gradually occurs in most of us as we grow older. It is one of the most common conditions affecting older and elderly adults. According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, approximately one in three people between the ages of 65 and 74 has hearing loss, and nearly half of those older than 75 have difficulty hearing. Beyond general hearing loss, our ability to hear certain frequencies is significantly reduced as we age - in most cases our frequency response drops to around 14kHz from 22kHz, with the majority of the 'drop off' happening once we reach 70. Bellow the 'drop off' their frequency response slopes-off rather than cutting altogether. 

In creating sound that is directional, hearing loss has to be considered. Some of the tones below accentuate 3.5kHz, 7kHz  and 14kHz - multiples of the most common drop off frequency. To someone with good hearing these frequencies are uncomfortable but to someone with a reduced ability to hear higher frequencies, this sound will enable them to gain a sense of direction without discomfort or confusion.  

 

  

INCOMING  CALL TONE 1 (Optimised for Hearing Loss)

Tone one consists of rhythmic and tonal layers. The the tonal layers function in numerous ways; their frequencies not only allow a 'call' to be more distinguishable from other electronic/digital devices such as, phones and computers, but its' frequency range also helps determine direction.

INCOMING  CALL TONE 2 (Optimised for Hearing Loss)

Tone one consists of rhythmic and tonal layers. The the tonal layers function in numerous ways; their frequencies not only allow a 'call' to be more distinguishable from other electronic/digital devices such as, phones and computers, but its' frequency range also helps determine direction. This ring tone incorporates a greater sense of melody for aesthetic purposes. 

INCOMING  CALL TONE 3 (Optimised for Hearing Loss and With Audio Discription)

Identical to Tone 2 only with the added Audio Description to help the user determine what is happening. The voice used in this clip has been emulated to represent an older persons voice - aiming to create a parallel between the user and Kraydel, ultimately reducing the risk of the function alienating the user. 

OUTGOING CALLS

With outgoing calls we can make a few more highly likely predictions regarding user position and intentions. We can assume that the user is in the vicinity of the Kraydel Hub and that they are active in interacting with it. These assumptions ultimately mean that the sound design here doesn't have to incorporate as much emphasis on direction and/or alert, it must simply communicate that something is happening. Although we can categorically assume that the user has initiated the call function, we can't be certain that they did it intentionally. Therefore the sound application has to be distinctive enough for the user to recognise that a call is being made. Through using sounds that the user is likely to associate to making a call, I believe that we can quite confidently guide perception to what is happening. My main question here is, what sounds are widely associated with making a call? It may seem obvious, but simply using the internal ring tone can significantly help establish this effect. I've also drawn influence from other common communication identities - tone 3 in particular has drawn a lot from the Skype outgoing call tone. 

OUTGOING  CALL TONE 1

This tone incorporates melody and rhythm, placing more emphasis on aesthetic and sonic identity. The harmonic make up of this ringtone is very much in line with the current Kraydel Audio Branding. A percussive shaker has also been used as this sound is often associated with waiting and/or anticipation, particularly within mainstream film/media.  

OUTGOING  CALL TONE 2

Here the tone is stripped back a little. There's a xylophone being played in a sequence reminiscent of morse code - this idea of reaching out to communicate. Again a percussive shaker has been used, drawing reference to waiting and/or anticipation. 

OUTGOING  CALL TONE 3

This tone takes on an entirely different approach. Here I draw reference to commonly used communication technology, particularly Skype. Through talking to elders at Kraydel workshops I noticed that one common theme was that most had some experience of staying in touch with family through Skype. Here the sound is of an echoed xylophone reminiscent of Morse Code coupled with the ring tone from the previous Tones. 

CALL CONNECT / DISCONNECT 

CALLING INTERACTION

29 - 01 -2019

INCOMING CALLS

Overview: 

The focus of the sound design has orientated around creating a sonic language which is predominantly associated with the Kraydel system - going further than stylistic elements - a sound design which considers the entire Kraydel system.

What do we mean by 'going beyond style'?  

 

The design here aims to build on the sonic usability of the product - aiming to create a clear and unmistakable identity. Can we establish a sound world which not only allows the user to determine that Kraydel is calling out to them, but that is removed far enough from other sound sources. This sonic differentiation between Kraydel and other sounds is perhaps the biggest challenge - there is no way to identify what other devices might be present in the varying home environments and therefore, establishing reference points is, at this stage, not a possibility. However, by looking beyond style/aesthetic, we can begin to consider other parameters, such as the hardware and spatial positioning.

 

Direction and Spatial Considerations: 

By utilising sound frequencies that are particularly effective in determining sound direction, we can start to consider the Kraydel Hub as an extension of the sound design. Some of the tones below exploit this parameter - their aim is to place the sound firmly at the hub, ultimately meaning that the user is likely to go to where the sound is being emitted. It's important to note that at this stage I haven't applied this technique to the alert tones.    

Sonic Differentiation: 

The incoming call function is a moment in which Kraydel is asking the user to respond, but unlike an alert, interacting with this function will produce an interactive event. The design of the tones below has been influenced by this aspect - placing emphasis on differentiation between other moments when Kraydel reaches out. Creating a clear sonic contrast between anything being emitted from the television and the Kraydel Hub has also been a key factor driving the sound design. By using high frequencies, at a slightly higher amplitude repetitively further enables the user to determine that there is an incoming call, even if they can't see the television. 

 

Age Related Hearing Loss:

Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is the loss of hearing that gradually occurs in most of us as we grow older. It is one of the most common conditions affecting older and elderly adults. According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, approximately one in three people between the ages of 65 and 74 has hearing loss, and nearly half of those older than 75 have difficulty hearing. Beyond general hearing loss, our ability to hear certain frequencies is significantly reduced as we age - in most cases our frequency response drops to around 14kHz from 22kHz, with the majority of the 'drop off' happening once we reach 70. Bellow the 'drop off' their frequency response slopes-off rather than cutting altogether. 

In creating sound that is directional, hearing loss has to be considered. Some of the tones below accentuate 3.5kHz, 7kHz  and 14kHz - multiples of the most common drop off frequency. To someone with good hearing these frequencies are uncomfortable but to someone with a reduced ability to hear higher frequencies, this sound will enable them to gain a sense of direction without discomfort or confusion.  

 

  

INCOMING  CALL TONE 1 (Optimised for Hearing Loss)

Tone one consists of rhythmic and tonal layers. The the tonal layers function in numerous ways; their frequencies not only allow a 'call' to be more distinguishable from other electronic/digital devices such as, phones and computers, but its' frequency range also helps determine direction.

INCOMING  CALL TONE 2 (Optimised for Hearing Loss)

Tone one consists of rhythmic and tonal layers. The the tonal layers function in numerous ways; their frequencies not only allow a 'call' to be more distinguishable from other electronic/digital devices such as, phones and computers, but its' frequency range also helps determine direction. This ring tone incorporates a greater sense of melody for aesthetic purposes. 

INCOMING  CALL TONE 3 (Optimised for Hearing Loss and With Audio Discription)

Identical to Tone 2 only with the added Audio Description to help the user determine what is happening. The voice used in this clip has been emulated to represent an older persons voice - aiming to create a parallel between the user and Kraydel, ultimately reducing the risk of the function alienating the user. 

OUTGOING CALLS

With outgoing calls we can make a few more highly likely predictions regarding user position and intentions. We can assume that the user is in the vicinity of the Kraydel Hub and that they are active in interacting with it. These assumptions ultimately mean that the sound design here doesn't have to incorporate as much emphasis on direction and/or alert, it must simply communicate that something is happening. Although we can categorically assume that the user has initiated the call function, we can't be certain that they did it intentionally. Therefore the sound application has to be distinctive enough for the user to recognise that a call is being made. Through using sounds that the user is likely to associate to making a call, I believe that we can quite confidently guide perception to what is happening. My main question here is, what sounds are widely associated with making a call? It may seem obvious, but simply using the internal ring tone can significantly help establish this effect. I've also drawn influence from other common communication identities - tone 3 in particular has drawn a lot from the Skype outgoing call tone. 

OUTGOING  CALL TONE 1

This tone incorporates melody and rhythm, placing more emphasis on aesthetic and sonic identity. The harmonic make up of this ringtone is very much in line with the current Kraydel Audio Branding. A percussive shaker has also been used as this sound is often associated with waiting and/or anticipation, particularly within mainstream film/media.  

OUTGOING  CALL TONE 2

Here the tone is stripped back a little. There's a xylophone being played in a sequence reminiscent of morse code - this idea of reaching out to communicate. Again a percussive shaker has been used, drawing reference to waiting and/or anticipation. 

OUTGOING  CALL TONE 3

This tone takes on an entirely different approach. Here I draw reference to commonly used communication technology, particularly Skype. Through talking to elders at Kraydel workshops I noticed that one common theme was that most had some experience of staying in touch with family through Skype. Here the sound is of an echoed xylophone reminiscent of Morse Code coupled with the ring tone from the previous Tones. 

CALL CONNECT / DISCONNECT 

Some of these punctuations work well with each other - I've labeled them in order of what I believe is a good match, e.g. Connect Sound 1 with Disconnect Sound 1. I think this is a good approach, these sounds should be connected to each other. When listening, try to work in twos - for instance play a sound and experiment with combining it to other sounds.  

CALL CONNECT 1

CALL INTERACTION

29 - 01 -2019

INCOMING CALLS

Overview: 

The focus of the sound design has orientated around creating a sonic language which is predominantly associated with the Kraydel system - going further than stylistic elements - a sound design which considers the entire Kraydel system.

What do we mean by 'going beyond style'?  

 

The design here aims to build on the sonic usability of the product - aiming to create a clear and unmistakable identity. Can we establish a sound world which not only allows the user to determine that Kraydel is calling out to them, but that is removed far enough from other sound sources. This sonic differentiation between Kraydel and other sounds is perhaps the biggest challenge - there is no way to identify what other devices might be present in the varying home environments and therefore, establishing reference points is, at this stage, not a possibility. However, by looking beyond style/aesthetic, we can begin to consider other parameters, such as the hardware and spatial positioning.

 

Direction and Spatial Considerations: 

By utilising sound frequencies that are particularly effective in determining sound direction, we can start to consider the Kraydel Hub as an extension of the sound design. Some of the tones below exploit this parameter - their aim is to place the sound firmly at the hub, ultimately meaning that the user is likely to go to where the sound is being emitted. It's important to note that at this stage I haven't applied this technique to the alert tones.    

Sonic Differentiation: 

The incoming call function is a moment in which Kraydel is asking the user to respond, but unlike an alert, interacting with this function will produce an interactive event. The design of the tones below has been influenced by this aspect - placing emphasis on differentiation between other moments when Kraydel reaches out. Creating a clear sonic contrast between anything being emitted from the television and the Kraydel Hub has also been a key factor driving the sound design. By using high frequencies, at a slightly higher amplitude repetitively further enables the user to determine that there is an incoming call, even if they can't see the television. 

 

Age Related Hearing Loss:

Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is the loss of hearing that gradually occurs in most of us as we grow older. It is one of the most common conditions affecting older and elderly adults. According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, approximately one in three people between the ages of 65 and 74 has hearing loss, and nearly half of those older than 75 have difficulty hearing. Beyond general hearing loss, our ability to hear certain frequencies is significantly reduced as we age - in most cases our frequency response drops to around 14kHz from 22kHz, with the majority of the 'drop off' happening once we reach 70. Bellow the 'drop off' their frequency response slopes-off rather than cutting altogether. 

In creating sound that is directional, hearing loss has to be considered. Some of the tones below accentuate 3.5kHz, 7kHz  and 14kHz - multiples of the most common drop off frequency. To someone with good hearing these frequencies are uncomfortable but to someone with a reduced ability to hear higher frequencies, this sound will enable them to gain a sense of direction without discomfort or confusion.  

 

  

INCOMING  CALL TONE 1 (Optimised for Hearing Loss)

Tone one consists of rhythmic and tonal layers. The the tonal layers function in numerous ways; their frequencies not only allow a 'call' to be more distinguishable from other electronic/digital devices such as, phones and computers, but its' frequency range also helps determine direction.

INCOMING  CALL TONE 2 (Optimised for Hearing Loss)

Tone one consists of rhythmic and tonal layers. The the tonal layers function in numerous ways; their frequencies not only allow a 'call' to be more distinguishable from other electronic/digital devices such as, phones and computers, but its' frequency range also helps determine direction. This ring tone incorporates a greater sense of melody for aesthetic purposes. 

INCOMING  CALL TONE 3 (Optimised for Hearing Loss and With Audio Discription)

Identical to Tone 2 only with the added Audio Description to help the user determine what is happening. The voice used in this clip has been emulated to represent an older persons voice - aiming to create a parallel between the user and Kraydel, ultimately reducing the risk of the function alienating the user. 

OUTGOING CALLS

With outgoing calls we can make a few more highly likely predictions regarding user position and intentions. We can assume that the user is in the vicinity of the Kraydel Hub and that they are active in interacting with it. These assumptions ultimately mean that the sound design here doesn't have to incorporate as much emphasis on direction and/or alert, it must simply communicate that something is happening. Although we can categorically assume that the user has initiated the call function, we can't be certain that they did it intentionally. Therefore the sound application has to be distinctive enough for the user to recognise that a call is being made. Through using sounds that the user is likely to associate to making a call, I believe that we can quite confidently guide perception to what is happening. My main question here is, what sounds are widely associated with making a call? It may seem obvious, but simply using the internal ring tone can significantly help establish this effect. I've also drawn influence from other common communication identities - tone 3 in particular has drawn a lot from the Skype outgoing call tone. 

OUTGOING  CALL TONE 1

This tone incorporates melody and rhythm, placing more emphasis on aesthetic and sonic identity. The harmonic make up of this ringtone is very much in line with the current Kraydel Audio Branding. A percussive shaker has also been used as this sound is often associated with waiting and/or anticipation, particularly within mainstream film/media.  

OUTGOING  CALL TONE 2

Here the tone is stripped back a little. There's a xylophone being played in a sequence reminiscent of morse code - this idea of reaching out to communicate. Again a percussive shaker has been used, drawing reference to waiting and/or anticipation. 

OUTGOING  CALL TONE 3

This tone takes on an entirely different approach. Here I draw reference to commonly used communication technology, particularly Skype. Through talking to elders at Kraydel workshops I noticed that one common theme was that most had some experience of staying in touch with family through Skype. Here the sound is of an echoed xylophone reminiscent of Morse Code coupled with the ring tone from the previous Tones. 

CALL CONNECT / DISCONNECT 

These punctuations have been designed to work well with each other - I've labeled them in order of what I believe is a good match, e.g. Connect Sound 1 with Disconnect Sound 1. I think this is a good approach, these sounds should be connected to each other. When listening, try to work in twos - for instance play a sound and experiment with combining it to other sounds.  

DISCONNECT 1

DISCONNECT 1

CONNECT 1

DISCONNECT 2

CONNECT 2

DISCONNECT 3

DISCONNECT 4

CONNECT 3

CONNECT 4